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Showing posts from April, 2020

USFWS Attempting to Ban Pack Llamas in ANWR

W e need your help again. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) recently announced that it is proposing to eliminate the pack llama (camelid) user group as part of a proposed regulation package. This is yet another attempt (in Alaska) to ban camelids as a disease threat to wildlife that is scientifically untenable. Because of your help earlier this year we were able to defeat a similar proposal by the U.S. Forest Service in Alaska (Chugach National Forest). Your participation will be critical in order to win this next battle. Again, this could set a precedent and adversely affect our future access on public lands throughout all of the United States if allowed to stand. Please object to this proposal by submitting a comment as per the instructions below.   Thank you in advance for your support! You can submit a comment on this to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in one of two ways described below. All comments need to be submitted on

Llama Association of North America (LANA) Spring Newsletter

See article "Pack Llamas Under Siege on Alaska's Public Lands." Lots of good info in this newsletter. Support LANA! LANA's Spring Newsletter Llama Association of North America (LANA) Spring newsletter cover photo features llamas on Lost Lake Trail (Alaska) with Resurrection Bay in the background.

Do Llamas Attract Bears?

It's that time of year again, and the bears are coming out. When walking or hiking with llamas I'm often asked "Do llamas attract bears?" Bears have been known to attack llamas but my experience has been that llamas don't attract bears anymore than any other pack stock or pets. In fact the llama's "alarm call" may act as a good deterrent for bears. Llamas are instinctively alert and aware of their surroundings, and usually draw attention to an intruder by making a startling "alarm call" when it senses danger. A llama is usually aware of a bear long before we can see or hear it and will let off their "alarm call" when the unwanted intruder is around. Click on the hyperlink to hear what a llama alarm call sounds like - Llama Alarm Call However, I would not recommend leaving llamas tied out unattended while camping. In that situation llamas would not be able to defend themselves from predators such as bears or even an